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Tag: mania


Mania - What is It Like?

Ever wonder what it feels like to have mania? Is it always euphoria and boundless energy? Look through the eyes of a 19 year old college student as she shares how mania has impacted her world.


Parent Version of the Young Mania Rating Scale (pdf version)

The P-YMRS is attached, in PDF format.

The P-YMRS consists of eleven questions that parents are asked about their child's present state. The original rating scale (Young Mania Rating Scale), was developed to assess severity of symptoms in adults hospitalized for mania. It has been revised in an effort to help clinicians such as pediatricians determine when children should be referred for further evaluation by a mental health professional (such as a child psychiatrist), and also to help assess whether a child's symptoms are responding to treatment. The scale is NOT intended to diagnose bipolar disorder in children (that requires a thorough evaluation by an experienced mental health professional, preferably a board-certified child psychiatrist). This version has been tested in a pediatric research clinic with a high number of children with bipolar disorder. The child's total score is determined by adding up the highest number circled on each question. Scores range from 0-60. Extremely high scores on the P-YMRS increase the risk of having bipolar disorder by a factor of 9, roughly the same increase as having a biological parent with bipolar disorder. Low scores decrease the odds by a factor of ten. Scores in the middle don't change the odds much.

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Parent Version of the Young Mania Rating Scale ( Word doc version)

The P-YMRS is attached, in Word format.

The P-YMRS consists of eleven questions that parents are asked about their child's present state. The original rating scale (Young Mania Rating Scale), was developed to assess severity of symptoms in adults hospitalized for mania. It has been revised in an effort to help clinicians such as pediatricians determine when children should be referred for further evaluation by a mental health professional (such as a child psychiatrist), and also to help assess whether a child's symptoms are responding to treatment. The scale is NOT intended to diagnose bipolar disorder in children (that requires a thorough evaluation by an experienced mental health professional, preferably a board-certified child psychiatrist). This version has been tested in a pediatric research clinic with a high number of children with bipolar disorder. The child's total score is determined by adding up the highest number circled on each question. Scores range from 0-60. Extremely high scores on the P-YMRS increase the risk of having bipolar disorder by a factor of 9, roughly the same increase as having a biological parent with bipolar disorder. Low scores decrease the odds by a factor of ten. Scores in the middle don't change the odds much.

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Medication-Induced Mania - Ethical Issues and the Need for More Research

Editorial by The Balanced Mind Parent Network Director Martha Hellander discussing the use of medication in treating children diagnosed with bipolar disorder.

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Discriminative Validity of a Parent Version of the Young Mania Rating Scale

Study to examine the usefulness of a parent report version of the Young Mania Rating Scale (P-YMRS) in distinguishing bipolar disorders from other mental health conditions in children and adolescents.

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